Anzeige
Anzeige

Archive (2005–2015)

Influence of calcium salts and bovine thrombin on growth factor release from equine platelet-rich gel supernatants

Journal: Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (VCOT)
ISSN: 0932-0814
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-16-02-0026
Issue: 2017: Issue 1 2017
Pages: 1-7
Ahead of Print: 2016-11-16

Influence of calcium salts and bovine thrombin on growth factor release from equine platelet-rich gel supernatants

C. E. Giraldo (1), M. E. Álvarez (1), J. U. Carmona (1)

(1) Grupo de Investigación Terapia Regenerativa, Departamento de Salud Animal, Universidad de Caldas, Manizales, Colombia

Keywords

horse, equine, platelet concentrates, platelet-derived growth factor BB, transforming growth factor beta 1, calcium salts, bovine thrombin

Summary

Objective: To compare five activation methods in equine platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by determination of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentrations in platelet-rich gel (PRG) supernatants. Methods: Platelet-rich plasma from 20 horses was activated by calcium chloride (CC), calcium gluconate (CG), bovine thrombin (BT), and their combinations, BTCC and BTCG. Both growth factor concentrations in PRG supernatants were measured by ELISA and compared with plasma and platelet lysates (PL) over time. Results: Growth factor concentrations were significantly lower in plasma and higher for all PRG supernatants. Platelet lysates contained a significantly lower concentration of PDGF-BB than PRG supernatants and a significantly higher concentration of TGF-β1 than PRG supernatants. Clots from PRP activated with sodium salts were more stable over time and had significant growth factor release, whereas CC produced gross salt deposition. Significant correlations were noticed for platelet with leukocyte concentrations in PRP (rs: 0.76), platelet counts in PRP with TGF-β1 concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.86), platelet counts in PRP with PDGF-BB concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.78), leukocyte counts in PRP with TGF-β1 concentrations in PRG supernatants (rs: 0.76), and PDGF-BB concentrations with activating substances (rs: 0.72). Clinical significance: Calcium gluconate was the better substance to induce PRP activation. It induced growth factor release free from calcium precipitates in the clots. Use of BT alone or combined with calcium salts was not advantageous for growth factor release.

You may also be interested in...

1.

J. C. González (1), C. López (1), J. U. Carmona (1)

Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2016 29 2: 115-124

https://doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-15-01-0011

2.

J. P. Johnson (1), J. D. Stack (1), C. Rowan (1), I. Handel (2), J. M. O'Leary (1)

Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2017 : -

https://doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-16-09-0139

3.

S. Frei (1), H. Geyer (2), S. Hoey (3, 4), A. E. Fuerst (1), A. S. Bischofberger (1)

Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2017 : -

https://doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-16-08-0121